Oversubscribed

And why I don’t even have Netflix.

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As consumers, we are over-contracted with pay-for-service subscriptions these days. Such as:

  • Fitness clubs
  • Home phone (ha!)
  • Cell phone
  • Home internet
  • Cable television
  • Newspapers
  • Banking plans (technically not a subscription service… but it kind of is, right?)
  • Costco
  • Amazon Prime
  • Netflix
  • Spotify
  • Sirius XM Radio
  • Insurance Plans
  • Software Plans

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Savings accounts & investment accounts – what’s the right balance?

Bad things happen. Best be prepared.

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I have lived most of my life on financial edge. First it was school, then it was contract jobs. There was never a moment of financial stability until about 2 years ago when I transitioned into full-time employment.

In that time between steady job and what felt like drifting, I was a hoarder. I’d save as much as my pay check as I could and stick it in a savings account, watching it grow a measly 0.5% at the time (this is pre-discovery of Tangerine and EQ Bank). My savings allocations were basically 100% emergency fund, 0% investments.

Continue reading “Savings accounts & investment accounts – what’s the right balance?”

My middle class privilege.

My parents gave me life, Canadian citizenship, and economic advantage.

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I was born lucky. Even before I exited my mother’s womb, it was predetermined for me that I would be a middle class Canadian growing up. Going to school was never going to be an issue, neither was having food on the table, a roof over my head, or a loving family.

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DRIP Investing.

I like my investing the way I like my coffee.

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In my office we have a coffee connoisseur.

He makes his cup of Joe in a French press twice a day with incredible meticulousness. First, he coarse grinds his beans at his desk by hand with a little manual machine. Then he puts it in his press, pours boiling water in it and gives it a stir. He waits precisely 4 minutes to the second before pushing down on the plunger and pouring the brew into his mug, mixing it with some hot milk he has just microwaved. It’s an absolute symphony to watch the preciseness of it all. It’s also so much damn work.

Me? I watch it in bemusement with my cup of drip Kirkland brand coffee. It’s the cheaper and easier way to get what I want – just like my investments.

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A Guide to Dollar-cost Averaging

Why I invest my money, two weeks at a time.

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I’m a risk averse person. I don’t bike in the city, I don’t enjoy jumping into water, and I don’t even dare go ten above the speed limit (put me in the slow lane, thanks very much). When it comes to my investments, it’s very much the same thing.

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When Index Investing, I Skip the TSX

Canada is great. Its major stock market index is not.

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A diverse nation with an undiversified index.

Passive investing is in, active investing is out. The literature is all there, frequently citing how a passive fund tracking the major international indices will frequently outperform actively managed mutual funds. Those passive index funds also have lower management fees, to boot.

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Get your MBA for Free.

How I completed a 20-month MBA without a significant change in my net worth.

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Back in 2012, I made a decision that accelerated my career and income potential. I did an MBA. Three letters that mean: smart, employable, qualified.

The source of this big leap back into academia originated during my job as a project coordinator. I would sit in meetings with project managers and it was very obvious that they all made way more than me. After some LinkedIn stalking, I found that they all had business degrees.

Continue reading “Get your MBA for Free.”