A Guide to Dollar-cost Averaging

Why I invest my money, two weeks at a time.

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I’m a risk averse person. I don’t bike in the city, I don’t enjoy jumping into water, and I don’t even dare go ten above the speed limit (put me in the slow lane, thanks very much). When it comes to my investments, it’s very much the same thing.

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When Index Investing, I Skip the TSX

Canada is great. Its major stock market index is not.

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A diverse nation with an undiversified index.

Passive investing is in, active investing is out. The literature is all there, frequently citing how a passive fund tracking the major international indices will frequently outperform actively managed mutual funds. Those passive index funds also have lower management fees, to boot.

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August 2017: Financial Update

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The site at Evergreen Brick Works

The last month of summer came and went, and with it went $2046.37 in expenses, inclusive of higher entertainment, dating, and food costs. With fall approaching, sometimes you just have to cram in missed opportunities, right?

My savings rate of my take home pay for this particular month was 56.9%. Not quite as good as August last year, but a number I’m still quite happy with.

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The Best Board Games for the Frugal

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Last month I casually tweeted about my Friday night:

To my surprise, this casual offhand tweet received 24 likes – now I know, that’s not necessarily Lady Gaga numbers, but clearly the concept of board games is one that resonates with many of us since they’ve been a staple of everyone life at some point another. Some side conversations started about which ones people played so I thought: “Hey! I know a lot about board games games, why don’t I post about it?”

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Get your MBA for Free.

How I completed a 20-month MBA without a significant change in my net worth.

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Back in 2012, I made a decision that accelerated my career and income potential. I did an MBA. Three letters that mean: smart, employable, qualified.

The source of this big leap back into academia originated during my job as a project coordinator. I would sit in meetings with project managers and it was very obvious that they all made way more than me. After some LinkedIn stalking, I found that they all had business degrees.

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Don’t buy a $1 million home in the city. Buy a good bed instead.

Why home ownership is costly and overrated.

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Being prospective home buyer in the city is disheartening. Despite numerous efforts by the Ontario government to try and cool prices, the average home in the Toronto region still sits at just under $750,000. So sure, while home prices dropped 19% from April to August, prices still rose a total of over 33% in the first quarter alone. Real estate is still a rip-off in this town, even the condo market.

Yet every day, a common discussion amongst some of my millennial friends is the lingering sadness that they’ll “never be able to afford a house.” My question to them is “why the desperation?”

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My Life Below Minimum Wage.

An origin story on the year that changed my life.

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It was September 2011 and I was greeted by an elderly cowgirl.

“Welcome to Calgary!” she said with a big smile. I smiled back nervously.

I had just gotten off a plane from Toronto, leaving behind my admission to law school, my family, and my friends. Instead, I was heading off to work at an arts and culture centre in a small mountain town in one of the most beautiful regions in all of Canada.

My parents communicated to me before I left what I was leaving behind: the promise of a stable job, predictable income, and social prestige (I know – parents, right?). They told me my life was my life, but if I ever regretted my decision, I was not to call them. I guess that’s one way of making sure your kid leaves the nest.

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